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Fig. 1.1 (A) A fresh-tissue specimen of the myofascial meridian known as the Superficial Back Line, dissected intact by Todd Garcia
from the Laboratories of Anatomical Enlightenment. (Photo courtesy of the author.) (DVD ref: This specimen is explained on video on the
accompanying DVD) (B) A dissection of teased muscle fibers, showing surrounding and investing endomysial fascia. (Reproduced with
kind permission from Ronald Thompson.) (DVD ref: This and other graphics are available and explained in Fascial Tensegrity, available
from www.anatomytrains.com) (C) A section of the thigh, derived from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project, using
National Institute of Health software, by structural practitioner Jeffrey Linn. This gives us the first glimpse into what the fascial system
would look like if that system alone were abstracted from the body as a whole. Once this process is complete for an entire body, a
laborious process now underway, we will have a powerful new anatomical rendering of the responsive system that handles, resists and
distributes mechanical forces in the body. (Reproduced from US National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Data® Project, with kind
permission.) (DVD ref: This and other graphics are available and explained in Fascial Tensegrity, available from www.anatomytrains.com)
(D) A diagram of the fascial microvacuole sliding system between the skin and the underlying tendons as described by Dr J. C. Guimberteau.
(Diagram courtesy of Dr J. C. Guimberteau.) (DVD ref: Strolling Under the Skin, available from www.anatomytrains.com)
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