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Table 11.1 Best Evidence of Treatment Effectiveness for Depression
Therapy
Major depression
Dysthymia
Maintenance
CBT
Probably efficacious
Potentially
useful/helpful
Incomplete
evidence
IPT
Incomplete evidence
Potentially
useful/helpful
Useful with
medication
BDT
Probably efficacious
No data
No data
RT
Potentially useful/helpful
No data
No data
Family
Incomplete evidence
Incomplete
evidence
Incomplete
evidence
Group
Has been researched with
incomplete evidence
Incomplete
evidence
Incomplete
evidence
BDT, brief dynamic therapy; CBT, cognitive-behavioral therapy; IPT, interpersonal therapy;
RT, reminiscence therapy.
Table 11.1 ( Zalaquett and Stens, 2006, p. 197 ) shows our current state
of research-based knowledge about treatments that work best with adults
experiencing depression.
In summarizing treatment effectiveness with older clients experiencing
depression, Myers and Harper (2004) report that many interventions have
been found effective with older adults “ ... diagnosed with subclinical or
clinical depression. These include reminiscence; individual behavioral,
cognitive, and brief psychodynamic therapies; group psychodynamic and
cognitive-behavioral therapies; and self-help bibliotherapy” (p. 210).
TREATING WORK-RELATED ANXIETY
Beck and Stanley (1997) report positive results with anxious clients using
cognitive-behavioral therapy and relaxation training. Benefits for older
clients experiencing anxiety appear as positive as they are with younger
clients. Smith, Sherrill, and Celenda (1995) have found that adults
respond well to psychotherapy for anxiety, “especially if it supports their
religious beliefs and encourages life review that helps to resolve both hid-
den and obvious conflicts associated with specific events in the patient's
life history” (p. 6). The authors recommend medications only after all
options have been considered. Most anxiety problems in younger clients
are treated with benzodiazepines, but these have only a “marginal efficacy
for chronic anxiety and are especially bad for older adults because the
body accumulates the drug and may produce excess sedation, diminished
sexual desire, worsening of dementing illness, and a reduction in the
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